roy~royesfamilylinks
genealogy of the roy and royes families
First Name:  Last Name: 
Maiden Married
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]
Ann Phillis Knight

Ann Phillis Knight

Female 1813 - 1896  (83 years)

 Set As Default Person    

Personal Information    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Ann Phillis Knight 
    Born 11 Mar 1813  Broadstairs, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Migration/Travel 2 Sep 1873  Brisbane, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Migration/Travel 2 Dec 1876  Brisbane, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Died 4 Sep 1896  Bulimba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Bulimba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Bulimba cemetery
    Notes 
    • played and grew up with Charles Dickens

      In 1872 she left her loved native land and sailed for Australia. Charles Dickens had died two years before. Many of his books were on shelves in the new home.

      There is a story of a picture of a ship. It was in an Australian reading book - primer 2 and belonged to Marian Hurley Pratt in 1885-6. The grandma missed the sea and ships so much. Years later when MHP became possessor of the family bible there was the picture being used as a book mark, and now it is being placed - not as a brass tablet in a grand Cathedral but as a lasting memorial to a good woman, loved by all who knew her.

      One thing, when people leave their homes for a foreign unknown place they carry a few mementos with them, memories of loved ones and places. Ann Phillis (Knight) Hougham took a photo of her parish church with her parents stone marked. This picture is 12 x 14 inches [305 x 356 mm], was framed and wherever she lived it was hung on her living room wall. It was taken from England to Australia, back to England and back to Australia, then to the USA and many times back and forth from Utah to California, and like the names on the old tombstones fading with age - MHP

      MHP (her granddaughter) also writes :-

      " Have you ever stood on the deck of a ship seeing your native land with everyone and everything dear to you gradually fading away in the distance? My own experience recalled in my mind a poem in my school reading book - one verse in particular - "The Emigrant Ship" All on deck together, young and old they stand, husbands wives and children, clasping hand in hand. On each face is sorrow that they'll see no more when thay wake tomorrow - their own native shore"

      Now let us follow the ship Great Queenslander and meet new people. Those days ships depended entirely on wind and sails. Today (1958) a trip of that distance can be covered by a steamship, a floating city of palaces of the latest conveniences, i in 2 to 3 weeks - which took a sailing ship upwards of 3 to 5 months, often the meals curtailed to a dry sea biscuit like a soda cracker but about 3 square inches [20 sq cm] in size and one half an inch [38 mm] thick, so hard even a hammer would not break them; one would last for hours, a little piece of corn beef (sometimes green with age) and that was your meal. Today the same trip can be covered by a plane practically in a few hours.

      Why did Ann P (K) Hougham go to Australia in 1872 as soon as her husband passed away, and take her two unmarried daughters? They were comfortably fixed and had no lack of friends, the girls in their teens in life's fullest activities. Only a mother could understand the answer. Out of her family of 9, 3 sons had died infants [William George, presumably William John and ??], her eldest son [Henry] was married and had to go to Canada, her eldest daughter [Elizabeth Ann] had married and with her husband and first four children moved to the USA. Her second daughter was married but had an invalid husband withTB, she would remain in London and trust in the future. There was still one son who had been gone 12 years .... yes you guessssed. He was in Australia, he had kept in touch with his mother. He was spirited away when 15 or 16 of age by the families own minister who said his own boy was wild and determined to emigrate, so he offered to pay young Fred Hougham's passage to go with his son, etc and when Fred insisted he should go and ask his folkes permission and get clothes etc the minister assured Fred that everything would be alright, proved, and he would immediately go to parents and explain all.

      A person who could do such a despicable trick, could do more - he did not go immediately, he let Fred's folk worry and seek until the ship was well out to sea. So almost a year went by before the first letter and the true story reached the folks at home in England. So the mother decided to go to her boy.

      The place was as beautiful as he had described - but - it was far from cities or towns, on a small mining claim, no stores or post office, just a few young people 2 or 3 of them married, no church, just in the midst of God’s own handiwork, nature itself, flowers, birds, butterflies even the insects and reptiles in brilliant colours, a clear stream of cold clear water, plenty of wild fruit and berries.Perfection, but nothing to do. The two sisters from the great city of London grew listtless, the mother agreed all should return to England, their busy lives and friends and Fred ought to come along. They moved 430 miles [692 km] to Bulimba, a small village on the outskirts of the City of Brisbane, to await the coming of a sailing ship and find something to occupy time.

      During the waiting period a friend of Fred's had taken a liking for the youngest sister and when the ship was due begged her to remain and be his wife. She would not remain.

      "The Darling Downs" was lifting anchor, tie ropes all untied, sailors unfurling sails, getting a foot or so from her moorings, when a young man with suitcase in hand leaped aboard. John William Hurley joined the Hougham family on their return trip around Cape Colony. So Africa to England. The return trips were not emigrants, very few passengers. There is nothing prettier or more stately than a ship in full white sail leaving or entering port unless a graceful white swan gliding along admiring its reflection in the water. The group aboard the ship were happy.

      Arriving "home" safely in due time was a disappointment, things had changed in those few short years. Old friends gone, some moved and some died, young folks married and got their home cares now. Most of all they had forgotten the constant fogs and drizzling rain of London and longed for the sunshine and cloudless skies of Queensland. Fred and John William were feeling the effects of the damp. Decisions had to be made.

      They all agreed that the sunny days in Australia would be good for Sarah's invalid husband, again they pack up, not only suitcases but household goods etc and soon were on their return journey to Australia going by way of South America round Cape Horn on the "British Nation" with 600 emigrants aboard. This trip was rough, crowded full of thrills and excitement - they were all glad when it ended.

      Volumes could be written about this one journey alone, Suffice to say it ended safely and this story continues with the lives of each individual . The mother had her family, John William Hurley gained his prize - Mary Ann Hougham became his bride and wife. It is after this marriage that MHP enters the scene.

      For more information about her ancestors see http://hougham.royroyes.net/pedigree.php?personID=I1226&tree=hougham
      [2]
    Person ID I4184  Roy~Royes | Hougham
    Last Modified 4 Nov 2008 

    Family Henry Hougham
              b. 1 Feb 1818
              d. 20 Aug 1872  (Age 54 years) 
    Married 31 Mar 1841  Stepney, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Henry Dun Hougham
              b. 26 Jan 1840, Islington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 18 Aug 1918, Pawtucket, RI, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     2. William George Hougham
              b. 1844, Islington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1844  (Age 0 years)
     3. Frederick William Hougham
              b. 2 Dec 1844, Islington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 19 May 1921, Bulimba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     4. Elizabeth Ann Hougham
              b. 26 Aug 1846, Islington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1 Mar 1935, Pawtucket, RI, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
    +5. Sarah Elizabeth Hougham
              b. 13 Nov 1848, Islington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 13 Jan 1906, Ipswich, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     6. Edward John Hougham
              b. 20 Mar 1851, St George in the East, Tower Hamlets, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1852  (Age 0 years)
     7. Charlotte Hawkes Hougham
              b. 20 Mar 1851, St George in the East, Tower Hamlets, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 14 Nov 1916, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     8. William George Hougham
              b. 10 Feb 1854, St George in the East, Tower Hamlets, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. Bef 27 Jul 1854, St George in the East, Tower Hamlets, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +9. Mary Ann Hougham
              b. 31 May 1856, Stepney, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 26 Apr 1945, Pinedale, Navajo County, AZ, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
    Last Modified 28 Mar 2014 02:30:18 
    Family ID F1479  Family Group  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 11 Mar 1813 - Broadstairs, Kent, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 31 Mar 1841 - Stepney, London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMigration/Travel - 2 Sep 1873 - Brisbane, QLD, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMigration/Travel - 2 Dec 1876 - Brisbane, QLD, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Sep 1896 - Bulimba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Bulimba, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S129] QLD State Archives- immigration.

    2. [S19] Hougham - The Book of Houghams, Marion Hurley Pratt, ((Arizona, after 1958)).